Research Projects

Building Research in the Learning Sciences

Student in classSince 1984, the Center has been an integral part of Tennessee State University's research contributions at the state and national levels. The Center aims to conduct research that addresses the needs and priorities of the educational community. The world today is more technologically complex and economically competitive which requires an approach to education that promotes the development of creative individuals who can develop new knowledge and continually further their own understanding.  

Learning Sciences focuses on student learning processes, instructional techniques, the creation of learning environments, and understanding the layers of knowledge that are essential for learners to improve their performance on cognitive tasks. The Center is committed to growth in the research in Learning Sciences by combining STEM education with experiential learning in the classroom. Our solid reputation is built on significant research, collaboration, and public service.

Research Areas of Focus

The Center is continually embarking on new areas of research including innovative approaches to child care, K-12 education, adult learning, higher education persistence and retention efforts, and more. Here's a look at some of our recent work.

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The Impact of COVID-19 on the Early Childhood Community 

Dr. Kimberly Smith

The effects of this pandemic have taken its toll on everyone, from children to adults, small to big businesses, and health care to education. The purpose of this study is to gather a deeper insight of the impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the child care community across Tennessee. 

Pay Inequity School Readiness

Gender and Pay Inequity in the Child Care Field

Dr. Erin Lynch and Dr. Celeste Brown

Child care as a profession has historically been dominated by women. It appears that even in a field that is 93% employed by women, the pay inequities are still prevalent.

Solving School Readiness: The Three-Component Solution

Dr. Katari Coleman

Kindergarten teachers have reported that more than half of their students were not ready for school. This white paper proposes a three-component solution that can be implemented in child care environments to increase school readiness in young children.