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Suggested LLP Electives

Instructor-Provided Course Descriptions

Williams Teaching

Fall 2017

Engl 3010: Critical Approaches  
Instructor: Dr. Morgan-Curtis

Catalog Description: A writing-intensive introduction to major critical theories with emphasis on application to interpretation of literary works. Students interpret a number of literary works drawn from different genres and periods, applying several different theoretical perspectives, such as feminism, new historicism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, and cultural and gender studies. Prerequisites: ENG 1010, 1020, 2011 (or 2018), and 2021 (or 2028). The course is required of all English majors and is a prerequisite or corequisite for English majors to all upper-division courses in literature. 

Engl 3106/7: Tech Report Writing (several sections)
 
Instructor: Prof. Williams, Dr. Irby 

Catalog Description: A study of fundamentals of written reports in a variety of professional fields, with the emphasis on grammar, sentence structure and style, as well as on specialized techniques. 3105 focuses on reports required in professional engineering. 3106 is the study and preparation of forms and reports required of students majoring in Criminal Justice. 3107 is the study and preparation of forms and reports required of social workers. Acquaintance with documents of various agencies is stressed. 

Engl 3110: Creative Writing Short Story 
Instructor: Dr. Phillips 

Catalog Description: A workshop in short story writing. The course examines the techniques and problems involved in writing the short story and places emphasis on the use of the senses and the writing about the experience of living.

Engl 3290: Survey of British Lit. I
Instructor: Dr. Hennequin

Catalog Description: A survey of important British writers beginning with the Old English tradition and continuing to the Romantic Period.

Engl 3410: Literature of Romantic Movement
Instructor: Dr. Powers

Catalog Description: A study of representative selections from 1798 to 1832. Attention is given both to poetry and prose.

Engl 3650: Contemporary Black Novel
Instructor: Dr. Hayes 

In English 3640, students will explore African American writers through the theme of transformation. Throughout the semester, we will consider the various challenges Black men and women have faced in the U.S. and the various strategies they used to survive, thrive, and carry-on. When you hear the word contemporary, what comes to mind? New, Fresh, Now…In Contemporary Black Novel, we will read contemporary works written by African-American writers. The texts will challenge genre conventions while uncovering connections between the past and charting a course for the future. These writers all envision a complex future by reflecting on ever present issues from the past. Join us as we travel forward while looking back.

Engl 3720: Adolescent Literature  
Instructor: Dr. Shafer

A survey of literature relevant to the interests, concerns, and development of young adults. Required of English majors enrolled in the Teacher Education Program. This course provides an introduction to the interpretation of texts (books, poetry, short stories, music, films, TV shows, video games, etc.) that have been constructed for young adults. This course emphasizes the use of various literary, linguistic, and media-specific approaches as part of the analysis of these young adult texts. While this course includes a brief history of the development of young adult literature, its primary goal is to help students practice reading and evaluating young adult texts in order to cultivate engagement with different literary forms through the development of various cultural, interpretive, and modal literacies.

Engl 3730: Children's Literature
Instructor: Prof. Parham

English 3730 is a survey of literature written for children from preschool through elementary school ages.  This course offers perspective teachers of the primary grades the opportunity to become familiar with literature suited to the needs and tastes  of children.  Principles that underline the selection of children’s literature for classrooms and libraries are considered.  Required for all candidates for certification in Elementary Education.

Engl 4000: Senior Seminar  
Instructor: Dr. Murillo  

English 4000 Senior Seminar is designed to complete the English major by inquiring into the purposes and methods of the liberal arts in general and literary study in particular.  Attention is paid to the resources for literary scholarship, criticism, revision, and publication.  This course is required for all English majors.

Engl 4840: History and Literature of the British Empire
Instructor: Dr. Dixon

A survey of the major social, cultural, and political developments associated with the British Empire from 1850 to the present.  The course explores the impact of Empire on the British, colonized peoples, and the development of postcolonial cultures and identitiesA survey of the major social, cultural, and political developments associated with the British Empire from 1850 to the present. The course explores the impact of Empire on the British, colonized peoples, and the development of post-colonial cultures and identitiesA survey of the major social, cultural, and political developments associated with the British Empire from 1850 to the present. The course explores the impact of Empire on the British, colonized peoples, and the development of post-colonial cultures and identities

Engl 4920: Advanced Poetry Writing  
Instructor: Dr. Pinkard  

In advanced workshop in writing poetry we will give close attention to your poetry.  We will read and discuss a variety of poetic forms, with a special interest in African American poetic form. The course examines the techniques involved in writing poetry by folding in approaches to various poetic modes and relating poetry to other forms of art. The course covers such elements of poetry as rhythm, lineation, image-making, and figurative language. Each week we will discuss the work of renowned poets, and critique the poems of workshoppers. We will engage in longer works and more strategic approaches toward revision. By the end of the course, students will have a number of polished and completed poems. Understanding the demands and rewards of a poetry inspired life will be our shared goal and motivation. 

Summer 2017

Engl 3106: Tech Report Writing
Instructor: Dr. Field

Catalog Description: A study of fundamentals of written reports in a variety of professional fields, with the emphasis on grammar, sentence structure and style, as well as on specialized techniques. 3105 focuses on reports required in professional engineering. 3106 is the study and preparation of forms and reports required of students majoring in Criminal Justice. 3107 is the study and preparation of forms and reports required of social workers. Acquaintance with documents of various agencies is stressed. 

Engl 3730: Children's Literature
Instructor: Prof. Parham

English 3730 is a survey of literature written for children from preschool through elementary school ages.  This course offers perspective teachers of the primary grades the opportunity to become familiar with literature suited to the needs and tastes  of children.  Principles that underline the selection of children’s literature for classrooms and libraries are considered.  Required for all candidates for certification in Elementary Education.

Engl 4010: (Special Topics) Intersecting Lives in Paris
Instructors: Drs. Dixon and Hayes

Ten students will go to Paris, France to learn more about African American, transnational, and literary histories. Students will be introduced to intersectionality, a term that encourages readers to see the interlocking oppressive aspects of identity. The program is entitled "Intersecting Lives: Reading African American Literature through a Black Feminist Lens." As noted in the proposal for the course, “Paris holds a special place in the hearts of many writers; especially those obsessed with the Harlem Renaissance. During this period, African-American artists of diverse genres flocked to the city to escape the realities of a racist society.” 

Spring 2017

Engl 3120: Creative Writing Poetry
Instructor: Dr. Pinkard

A workshop in writing poetry, this course will emphasize trends and genres in African American poetic form. The course examines the techniques involved in writing poetry by folding in approaches to various poetic modes and relating poetry to other forms of art. Each week we will discuss the work of renowned poets, and critique the poems of workshoppers. By the end of the course, students will have a number of polished and completed poems. Understanding the demands and rewards of a poetry inspired life will be our shared goal and motivation.

ENGL 3710: Methods in Teaching High School English
 
Instructor: Dr. Shafer 

This course covers the basics of methods used in the teaching of English in the secondary schools. Clinical and field-based experiences which call for active participation by students are part of the course requirements. This course is required of all English majors in the Teacher Education Program. Prerequisite: official admission to Teacher Education Program. This course provides an introduction to multiple theoretical frameworks and real-world strategies for the instruction of English at the high and middle school levels. This course will be taught from both linguistics and literacy studies approaches. Concepts that will be covered include fundamentals of grammar, composition, visual literary, stylistic analysis, literary evaluation, concept scaffolding, assignment design, and so on. 

Engl 4010-01: Special Topics: August Wilson's Pittsburgh Cycle
Instructor: Dr. Hayes

"We will not be denied our history" - August Wilson.

August Wilson (April 27, 1945-October 2, 2005) was one of the most important American playwrights of all time. His crowning achievement The Pittsburgh Cycle chronicles the joy and complexity of African-American life throughout the 20th century. He wrote a 10 play cycle, the only American playwright to achieve this feat, which focuses on African Americans in every decade of the 20th century. This class will offer students an opportunity to see the history of African American people dramatized by a brilliant artist. Join us as we go on this journey.

Engl 4010-02: Special Topics: Reproductive Choice in American Film
Instructor: Dr. Minarich

This course examines the history of Hollywood’s on-screen portrayal of contraception, abortion, and women’s reproductive choice. We will consider how these films shape and are shaped by the contexts of feminism, law, censorship, medicine, and narrative. Films to be studied include Where Are My Children? (1916), Christopher Strong (1933), Leave Her to Heaven (1945), Love with the Proper Stranger (1963), Dirty Dancing (1987), and Obvious Child (2014), amongst others.

Engl 4012/Hon 4002: Special Topics: From Goddess to Warriors: The Evolution of the Female Superhero
Instructor: Dr. Wise

To celebrate the 75th anniversary of the creation of the Wonder Woman character, and with the impending release of the much anticipated Wonder Woman film in June 2017and the many comic book film adaptations, this course will increase students’ appreciation of these films by giving them the foundation for understanding the historical origins of the female superhero. In order to do so, we will look at figures from ancient Greek and Roman Mythology and read selected texts as a starting place.  Then we will trace the evolution of this archetype through various incarnations including, but not limited to, mythology, history, film, television, and comics.  This course will give students a deeper appreciation of the contemporary female superhero and what she has come to represent.

ENGL 4130: Advanced English Grammar
Instructor: Dr. Shafer  

This course covers the key aspects of English grammar. This course will introduce various fundamentals of linguistic study as they relate to both spoken and written English: morphology, word classes, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, phonetics, and so on. Special attention will be paid to how words are combined in order to produce meaningful phrases, clauses, sentences, paragraphs, and other examples of discourse. 

Engl 4600-01: African-American Women Writers
Instructor: Dr. Dixon

A course examining African-American women’s literary tradition with primary focus on fiction writing in the 20th and 21st centuries, but will include writing from other periods, as well as poetry, drama, essays and criticism. This semester we will explore identity, politics, and the intersection of race and gender.