Collection Development Policy  - 2013

Committee Members:

  • Ms. Glenda Alvin, Assistant Director, Collection Management Dept.
  • Dr. Janet Walsh, Coordinator, Avon Williams Campus Library
  • Mr. Mitchell Chamberlain, Circulation Librarian
  • Dr. Karen Gupton, Coordinator, Media Centers
  • Ms. Mary Swanson, Circulation Supervisor
  • Mrs. Barbara Taylor, Head, Cataloging Dept.
  • Mrs. Barbara VanHooser, Reference Librarian
  • Dr. Yildiz B. Binkley, Dean Libraries and Media Centers, ex officio member

Ad Hoc Members:

  • Mrs. Anita Etheridge, Government Documents Librarian
  • Mr. Fletcher Moon, Head, Reference Departmen
  • Mrs. Sharon Hull-Smith, Head, Special Collections



POLICY APOPROVED

Table of Content:

General Policy ………………………………………………...................................................................  3
Profile of University Community
………………………………...........................................………....…..  3
Mission/Service Philosophy ……………………......……...........................................…………….……..  4
Parameters of Collection ……………………......……...........................................…………….…...…..  4
Acquisitions Strategy ……………………......……...........................................………......................... 4
Book Allocation Formula ……………………......……...........................................…………….…....…..  5
Purchase Limitation Statements ……………………......……...........................................…….…...…..  6
Number of Copies ……………………......……...........................................……………...........…...…..  6
Interlibrary Loan & Document Delivery ……………………......……...........................….....…….…...….  6
Hardcover vs. Paperback ……………………......……........................................................................  6
Out of Print ……………………......……...........................................……….....……...........................  7
Textbooks ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….….........................  7
Material Selection/Statement of Policy ……………………......……...........................................…...….  8
Philosophy ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….…...…..................  8
Intellectual Freedom Statement ……………………......……..............................……….....…….…...….  8
Selection Responsibility ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….…......  8
Collection Initiatives ……………………......……................................................................................  9
Library Liaison Program ……………………......……...........................................……….....……..........  9-11
Special Collections ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….…...…....... 11-15
Government Documents ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….…...... 15-18
Juvenile Literature ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….…...…........ 18-19
Serials ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….…...…........................ 19-21
Electronic Journals ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….…...….......  21
Serials Binding ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….…...................  22
Serials Gifts ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….…...….................  22
Reference ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….…...…...................  22
Services to the Disabled ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….…......  23
Foreign Languages ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….….............  23
Gifts(Books) ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….….......................  23
TSU Theses and Dissertations ……………………......……...........................................……….............  24
Consortia and Contractual Agreements ……………………......……...........................................….......  25
Distance Learning ……………………......……...........................................………...............................  25
Media Centers ……………………......……...........................................……….....…...........................  25
Electronic Resources ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….…...........  26-27
Websites ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….…............................  27
Weeding, & Withdrawal of Materials ……………………......……...........................................……….....  28-30
Index ……………………......……...........................................……….....…….….................................  31

I. General Policy Statement                                                                                                            P3                          

A. Introduction
The purpose of the TSU libraries’ collection development policy is to establish guidelines and procedures for maintaining a collection that supports teaching and research as they relate to Tennessee State University’s curriculum and independent research by TSU students, faculty, and staff. It ensures that collection development activity contributes to the achievement of university goals. This policy is the primary document by which the TSU Libraries’ standards of collection development are communicated to the TSU community.

Establishing standards provides a means by which the growth of the collection can be guided and evaluated. By defining criteria for the selection of material, it ensures that collection strength is balanced among subject disciplines and information formats. This policy is subject to review and revision as University goals and objectives evolve.

 B. Profile of University Community
Tennessee State University
is governed by the Tennessee Board of Regents and began as a land grant institution and normal school for the education of African-Americans. It functioned as a teachers college until 1958, when other programs such as Agriculture, Home Economics, Business, and Aerospace Studies and a graduate school were added.

In 1979, Tennessee State University merged with the University of Tennessee- Nashville, thus making it a two-campus university. The University of Nashville was re-named the Avon Williams Campus and now houses the following: the College of Public Service and Urban Affairs, the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, the College of Business, College of Health and the Avon Williams Campus Library. The College of Liberal Arts, the College of Education, the College of Health Sciences, the College of Engineering, as well as, the College ofAgricultural, Human, and Natural Sciences are housed on the main campus. The university annually enrolls over 8,000 students.

The Martha M. Brown-Lois H. Daniel Library was built in 1977 and features a special collections department, which provides historical data pertaining to the university and its alumni. The library’s collection contains over 364,551 volumes and there are Media Centers on each campus. The library is a part of the following consortiums TALC, TBR Library Consortium, TBR Media Consortium, SOLINET, Project Athena, Tenn-Share and TEL which share resources.

C. Mission/Service Philosophy                                                                                                                                    P4
The TSU libraries’ primary objective is to select and provide effective access to information resources, which support the academic program of Tennessee State University
, and to support the University’s mission of “positive and life long learning, scholarly inquiry, and a commitment to the service of others.”

The TSU libraries also strive to continuously achieve these goals:

  • To give guidance to scholars of all levels in their search for information
  • To encourage students to develop a wider interest in learning through
  • reading beyond specific class assignments
  • To provide a physical environment, which will encourage optimum use ofthe libraries and the media centers
  • To maintain a strong orientation and information literacy program
  • To maintain a strong working relationship with the faculty through theliaison program
  • To acquire and provide access to information to assist faculty in theirresearch endeavors

II. Parameters of the Collection

A. Acquisitions Strategy
In compliance with the libraries’ mission statement, teaching and library faculty participate in a collaborative process to develop the collection. All materials purchased with library funds are housed in the library and become a permanent part of its inventory. Periodicals and media such as videos, slides, music compact discs, DVDs, and kits are funded from separate university budgets lines.

The library receives an annual book budget from the university. Occasionally these funds may be supplemented by instructional support funds from the Vice President for Academic Affairs budget. The library reserves 25% of the total book budget for reference titles and general selection. The remaining funds are allocated according to the funding formula described in the 2 nd edition of Library Acquisitions Policies and Procedures by Elizabeth Futas.

The funding formula includes such factors as: amount of basic support, student credit hours by degree granting fields, the annual number of titles published in the field, and the average cost of materials in the subject category. Book budget allocations are sent to academic departments in the fall. The spending deadline is the last Friday in March. All departments that have not fully encumbered their funds by the last Friday in April will have their funds transferred into accounts that have orders pending.

The Collection Development Committee retains control over purchasing and may approve or disapprove titles that are not within the scope of the Collection Development Policy. The Acquisitions Librarian has the authority for filling gaps and rounding out the collection with unspent departmental allocations.                                                                                 

B. Book Allocations Formula                                                                                                                                    P5
Allocable funds base is divided by 4. Each section is allocated in the following manner: A/ Amount for basic support; B/Amount for weighted Full Time Student Credit Hour(F.T.S.C.H.) for all academic majors ;C/Amount for publishing intensity (no. of titles published) in the field; D/Amount for average cost of materials in the field.

  1. Derivation of the weighted amounts:
    a) Taking the section and dividing it arrives at basic support by the number of departments.
    b) Weighted FTE students—each department’s F.T.S.C.H. are weighted in the following manner for the two main academic terms:
    c) Number of lower division undergraduates F.T.S.C.H. times .5
    d) Number of upper division undergraduates F.T.S.C.H. times 1.0.
    e) Number of graduate F.T.S.C.H. times 1.5.
    f) Published intensity—number of books published on an academic level for each subject area is factored against the            total number of books published annually. The factor is then multiplied by the allocation.
    g) Publication Cost—cost per group of titles in subject area is factored against the total cost of all publications. Factor is then multiplied by the allocation.
    h) EXAMPLE:
    Allocable funds=$90,000
    $90,000/ 4 = $22,500 for each area basic support
    weighted F.T.S.C.H., publishing intensity, publishing costs.
    22,500/ 38 departments = $592.11 basic support
    $22,500 x factor weighted F.T.S.C.H. = X
    $22,500 x factor publishing intensity = Y
    $22,500 x factor publishing cost = Z
    $592.11 + X + Y + Z = Allocable Departments Funds

C. Purchasing Policy Statements                                                                                                                              P6                                                                                                                                                                               

  1. Number of Copies
    Multiple copies of the same book eliminate shelf space and reduce the amount of funds available for covering gaps in the collection. In order to increase the number of titles in the collection, the library will purchase one print copy of a title. Two copies will be purchased if: a) title is required at both the Main Campus and the Avon Williams Campus; b) an African American title is needed in both the Special Collections and for circulating, c) the title is needed for reserves; and d) the title is needed for a subject field that experiences a high volume of traffic from students performing research. If the title is available in electronic format, one copy will be purchased.

  2. Interlibrary Loan
    One of the ways in which the library supplements the collection is through Interlibrary Loan or ILL. Interlibrary loan is an agreement between two libraries that offers students, faculty and staff the opportunity to borrow materials. If the library does not own a requested book or journal title, the user can have the ILL department request the item(s) from another cooperating library. However, before requesting an item through interlibrary loan, the library’s collection should be checked via electronic resources to discover whether TSU currently owns the item. To expedite delivery, the library may request items through the statewide courier service.
    The procedure is as follows: After establishing a username and password, the patron fills out an ILLIAD form, requesting the loan of books, dissertations, or journal articles. As a matter of common practice, audiovisual materials and textbooks are not accessible by ILL. When the libraries are assessed a fee from a lending library, that charge is transferred to the patron. In most cases, articles requested by patrons are delivered electronically.
    The interlibrary loan staff will monitor requests carefully. If an item is requested five (5) times in a year, an order request for that item should be sent to the Acquisitions/Serials Department.
  3. To maximize the book budget, the library will purchase the paperback copy whenever possible. The books will either receive a hard plastic cover from the vendor or be sent to the bindery.
  4. Out of Print Titles                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      P7
    The cost of books can increase considerably once they go out of print. The library has an agreement with its primary vendor, Midwest Library Services, to perform out-of-print searches. Otherwise, out-of-print books will only be searched upon the specific request of the faculty member or librarian. Out of print titles or print on demand titles will be purchased in electronic format, when available.
  5. Textbooks
    As a general rule, the library will not purchase books that are being used as course textbooks on TSU campuses. Faculty who desire to place textbooks on reserve are asked to request additional review copies from the publisher, along withstatements of permission to use. Textbooks may be purchased in certain hard sciences and highly technical fields where standard published works are in textbook format.
  6. Electronic Books (ebooks)
    The library has purchased ebook collections from the Ebook Collection (EBSCO), Safari Books, Books 24x7, APA, Springer, and Early American Imprints, as well as individual titles from Gale, Oxford, Grove and others. Ebooks are also available in databases which integrate them with ejournals, such as ScienceDirect and Wiley. Individual subject collections are purchased as funds are made available. Ebook MARC records are integrated into the online catalog, whenever possible. The library does not buy print copies of books that it has already purchased in electronic format.
  7. Patron Requests
    Although the majority of the book budget is allocated to the faculty, the library welcomes patron requests of titles that are not currently in its collection. However, such requests should be titles that support the curriculum and meet the criteria set forth in this policy.
  8. Replacement Copies
    We will attempt to replace lost or damaged books that are currently in print. We will purchase the latest edition of the title. If the book is out of print and the out of print (op)price is significantly higher that the original cost, the necessity of replacing the title will be weighed against the availability of other library owned titles in that subject area.
  9. Browsing Collection                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               P8
    The library has browsing areas for both books and periodicals, which encourage lifelong reading in the university community. During the course of the year, many titles are added to the collection, which have both scholarly and popular interests. Titles that lend themselves to leisure reading are temporarily housed in the Browsing Areas to bring them to the attention of our users. Books remain on the Browsing Area a maximum of six months, before being transferred to the stacks.

C. Materials Selection and Services/Statement of Policy

  1. Philosophy
    In keeping with the philosophy of the university to provide the best possible facilities for the growth and development of students and faculty, its libraries and media centers recognize that they have a major role in connection with the educational and research programs of the University. The library is the primary source of knowledge required to support the curriculum and service functions of the University as well as a disseminator of the findings of local researchers. Each title is considered for inclusion based on the following criteria:
    a)      The subject’s relevance to TSU’s undergraduate and/or graduate curriculum.
    b) The timelessness or timeliness of the information content.
    c)  The author’s qualifications and/or the information content.
    d)  The lasting qualities and the accessibility of the format.
    e) The price
    f)  The extent of the current holdings on the subject.
    g)  The inclusion of the title in select bibliographies.
  2. . Intellectual Freedom Statement
    The TSU libraries oppose censorship and support access to diverse opinions and beliefs. Materials will not be excluded because of unpopular social, political, or religious content or the origin, background, and views of the author. The libraries support the philosophy set forth by the American Library Association in the Library Bill of Rights. (See appendix) The libraries’ collection development mission and philosophy are the primary basis on which materials are selected. Library users wishing to challenge the inclusion of a book must file a “Request for Reconsideration of Library Material Form” with the Acquisitions Librarian who will then consult the Collection Development Committee.
  3. Selection Responsibility                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     P9
    The Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) is the legal and final authority concerning the selection materials. The President of the University enacts and facilitates the library policies set for by the TBR. The Vice President for Academic Affairs assigns the responsibility to the Dean of Libraries and Media Centers, who in turn, delegates the responsibility to Head of Acquisitions. The Head of Acquisitions and Serials makes decisions concerning materials selection as a primary function of the job assignment. To foster a collaborative and collegial selection process, the Dean of Libraries and Media Centers appoints librarians to serve as liaisons to academic departments and programs.

D. Collection Development Initiatives-Library Liaison Program
Tennessee State University Libraries encourage all faculty members to use the services offered through the Liaison Program. Librarians are assigned to each academic department as a liaison to provide services in the collection development, library instruction, information access for teaching and research, current and new library services, and products. A roster of Library Liaisons can be found at: http://www.tnstate.edu/library/library_liaisons.asp.

  1. Objectives of Library Liaison Program
    a)  The general objective of the program is to promote communications and exchange of ideas and information between the Libraries and the academic departments and programs. Specific objectives of the program are:
    Establishing an on-going dialog between the University Libraries and the academic departments and programs, thus building effective working relationships between the library and these areas.
    b) Improving library services and the visibility of the library.
    c)
    Integrating information access skills into all levels of the   curriculum.
    d)
    Improved orientation presentations including the mode of Delivery, materials and process for a more streamlined   communication.
    e)
    Enhancing collection development.
    f)  Personalizing library services.
    g)
    Enhancing the role of the library faculty as the spokespersons   for the libraries.
  2. About the Library Liaison                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                P10
    Library Liaison is a librarian who is formally designated as the primary contact between the Libraries and an academic department or program at the University. The Library Liaison is the professional that the faculty can call upon as the initial contact for assistance concerning information, library services, or issues.
    Liaisons provide two-way communication between the libraries and academic departments and foster a partnership to provide quality library services. The liaisons are expected to find out the information needs of their academic departments and present these needs in appropriate forums in the library for solutions.
    All library liaisons are expected to be well-informed about the library's collections, print and non-print, services, and policies. They are also skilled in interpreting and promoting them to the faculty and students in their academic units. Liaisons are expected to be or become knowledgeable of the subject matter and the nature of teaching and research conducted by their assigned academic departments.
  3. Responsibilities of the Liaisons
    a) Communication: Ongoing dialog between the liaisons and their academic departments is vital to the success of the program. It is the responsibility of the liaisons to introduce themselves and be available to the faculty via telephone, e-mail or face-to-face, onsite contract in or outside of the Library including the departmental meetings of their academic units.
    b) Collaboration: Library Liaisons are also expected to interact outside of the libraries by sharing information they have gathered during contacts and questions presented to them that need additional responses. The information brought back by the liaisons are vital to make sure that libraries' policies, resources and services are responsive to the needs of the faculty and students. The liaisons are encouraged to consult with their colleagues in gathering information for their assigned areas. 
    Through these contacts, the Liaisons monitor the information  and other library needs of their areas. Additionally, liaisons are charged with keeping the faculty in their assigned units well-informed about the services and policies, as well as current and planned resources available through the libraries. They also are  expected to notify faculty about new library services and materials of potential interest. 
    c)
    Collection Development: Liaison librarians are responsible for a variety of collection development activities in the assigned  areas, which are          coordinated by the Head of Acquisitions and Serials                                                                                                                                                                                                                     P11
    d) 
    Budget: Maintain an awareness of budget allocation and expenditures for their academic areas and convey the information to those departments
    e)
    Statistics and Reports: Provide support for accreditation process, new academic programs and grant proposals
    f)  Collaboration: Participate in the formulation and writing of collection development policy.
    g) Personalized Services-locate resources, compile bibliographies, create libguides, visit departments, etc., 
    h) Work with their assigned departments to develop collections and services that support faculty and departmental needs and goals.
    i) Work with faculty and students on special projects as needed. These projects may include designing effective library assignments, identifying and acquiring resources to strengthen specific areas of the collection, and integrating information technologies into the curriculum and instruction (e.g.Libguides).
    j) Be open to suggestions and requests from their assigned areas that concern library services and collections.

III. Library Collections and Formats

A. Special Collections and Archives Department
The aim of the TSU Libraries’ Special Collections and Archives Dept. is: to collect, preserve, and house all possible information relating to the history of Tennessee State University, special contributions made by alumni, publications, from and about the University, publications of former and present faculty members. To collect on a more selective basis, significant items pertaining to African American History, Tennessee History, rare and books which may enhance the research value of the library. This policy is not permanent, but will be reexamined when necessary, with the approach in mind of providing a policy statement, which is consistent with the needs of the educational and research programs of the institution.                                                    P12

The collection now includes University Archives, rare books, papers of individual members of the administration and faculty, student publications, photographs, video and audio recordings of various campus functions, black history and books. Selection of material rests primarily with the staff of the TSU Library.

  1. Types of Material (to be acquired)
    a) Books: Two copies of African American titles or authors with popular demandwill be purchased if budget permits. One copy will be placed in the general circulation area and the other in Special Collections & Archives. Examples are books by faculty and alumni of TSU, personalities such as Martin Luther King, August Wilson and others will be purchased in duplicates or in electronic format, when available. In the past, the collection has suffered significant material losses pertaining to the African American subjects, therefore, many of the titles are placed in Special Collections to restrict circulation.
    b) Journals: No special effort will be made to acquire journals unless the title is needed to complete titles in the TSU Archival Collection. Currently the titles that are housed in the area are AME Church Review, 1984 to present, Broadcaster, the Journal of Tennessee State Association of Teachers in Colored Schools, 1930-1966, Cupolian, Fall 1977-Summner 1988, The Faculty Journal, 1959-1978, Southern Christian Leadership Conference, 1980 to present and the following sorority and fraternity journals, Aurora (Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority), 1965-1992, Delta Journal (Delta Sigma Thetha Sorority), 1968-1989, Ivy Leaf (Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority), 1943-2000, Kappa Alpha Psi Journal, 1980-2005, The Oracle (Omega Psi Phi), 1977-1983 and The Sphinix (Alpha Phi Alpha), 1982-1984.
    c) Rare publications: If funds are available rare books will be acquired.
    d) Newspapers will not be acquired in Special Collections. In rare instances, newspaper may be accepted as part of a gift collection; these in turn will be arranged within the given collection. Page 13
    e) Audiovisual Materials: The library has a sizable collection of audiovisual material. The following are located in our area: video and audio recordings of various campus functions, video and audio recordings of the Afro American Culture & History Conference from 1989 to the present.                                P13
    f) Gifts: Gifts are encouraged, but must fall within the criteria of the collection development policy and be in good useable condition. Many valuable items can be acquired through this means. Books bearing the author’s autograph will be placed in Special Collection. 
    g) Manuscripts: The Special Collections and Archives Room has a collection of manuscripts and papers in its archives. Scholars, writers and organizations will be encouraged to give these to the library. Donations of collections will be encouraged. If funds should become available, the collection will be carefully examined as to the originator, importance, contents and value to the institution.
    h) Archives: The Library is the official depository for the archives of the University. Rules governing the collection and the housing of the archives must be outlined in the archive charter. Archival materials to be collected are:
                  Files from the Office of the Presidents 
                  Files from the Division of Academic Affairs
                  Files from the Division of Research and Sponsored Programs
                  Files from the Division of Student Affairs
                  Files from the Division of Technology & Administrative Services
                  Files from the Division of University Relations and Development
                  Faculty, Staff and Student Publications
                  University Catalogs
                  University Yearbooks
                  Bulletins, Newsletters, and Schedules of Classes
                  Unpublished histories of TSU
  2. Specialized Collections:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    P14
    a) Tennessee State University Archival Collection, 1912-. The University Archives includes digital resources, bibliography of the Afro-American Culture & History Conference, official publications and records of the university, papers of individual members of the administration and faculty, student publications, photographs, video and audio recordings of various campus functions and other materials relating to the University.     
    b) The Thomas Edward Poag Collection, 1939-1973. Dr. Thomas E. Poag founded the Tennessee State University Players Guild in 1939. He served as Director of the Players Guild, Head of the Department of Speech & Drama, and Dean of the School of Arts & Sciences during his tenure of thirty-four years at the University. Materials in the collection include manuscripts of publications, plays, newspaper clippings, correspondence, photographs, scrapbooks and other miscellaneous types of materials.
    c) Avon Williams Collection, 1945-1991. Avon Williams was a civil rights lawyer and prominent state senator for whom the downtown campus was named. This collection consists of memorabilia, newspaper clippings and material from the state senate.
    d) Edward S. Temple Collection, 1950-1994. Edward S. Temple served as Head Women’s Track Coach for forty-four years at Tennessee State University, Nashville, Tennessee and Associate Professor of Sociology. During his coaching tenure, forty members of his famed Tigerbelles teams have represented Tennessee State University in Olympic competition. This collection consists of newspaper clippings, books, correspondence, photographs, scrapbooks and memorabilia.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
    e) Daniel E. Owens Collections, 1963-1971. The first collection consists of sixty-eight full music scores that were arranged and performed by the Tennessee State Marching Band. The second collection consists of 2,000 recorded by great jazz musicians and other artists.
    f)Walter C. Robinson Collection, 1924-1968. The material in this collection consist of speeches, correspondence, his participation with the Republican Party, 4th Ward Chattanooga, TN and issues of the Chattanooga Observer, edited by Mr. Robinson from 1927-1962.
    g) C.B. Robinson Collection, 1911-1992. The materials in this collection  consists of  correspondence, newspaper clippings, minutes, programs, speeches, relating to his career as a state legislator Chattanooga, TN.                                                                                                                                                                                                    P15
    h) The Tennessee State University Alumni Collection, 1912- . This collection consists of brochures, newspaper clippings, programs and publications relating to alumni of the university.
    i) Russell C. Barbour Collection, 1887-1944. The Russell C. Barbour Collection consists of biographical information on Barbour, bulletins from First Baptist Church and Morehouse College, general and personal correspondence, newspaper clippings, photographs (such as Martin L. King & Christine King); programs and sermons.
    j) George W. Gore Collection, 1922-1982. Dr. Gore founded the Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society on November 26, 1937. The George W. Gore Collection consists of biographical data on Gore general and personal correspondence, accounts, bills & receipts, writings, speeches from his presidency of Florida A & M University programs, and printed matter including Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society.
    k) Digital Collection-is comprised of primary resources from HBCU libraries and archives. It includes several thousand scanned pages and represents HBCU Libraries first collaborative effort to make historic collections digitally available. Collections are contributed from member libraries of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Library Alliance. http://www.hbculibraries.org/html/hbcu-digital-collections.html

B. Government Documents

  1. Introduction
    Tennessee State University Brown-Daniel Library has been a selective depository for United States Government Documents since 1972. The library is one of five depositories in the 5th Congressional District of Tennessee. The other four depositories are all selective depositories: Fisk University, Public Library of Nashville and Davidson County, Tennessee State Library and Archives, and Vanderbilt University. The regional depository is located at the University of Memphis in Memphis, Tennessee.
  2. Mission                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
    The primary mission of the Brown-Daniel Library’s Department of Government Publications is to collect, organize and provide free quality access of federal publications to students, faculty and administration, the public at large.Tennessee State University has a diverse mission, which incorporates three unique characteristics: land grant, urban, and comprehensive services in higher education. As an 1890 land grant institution, it provides   instructional programs, statewide cooperative extension services, cooperative agriculturalresearch, and food and agricultural programs.  As a  comprehensive institution, it provides programming in agriculture, allied health, arts and sciences, business, education, engineering and technology, home economics, human services, nursing, and public administration. As a major urban institution, located in the capital city, it provides both degree and non-degree programs (day, evening, weekend, and at off-campus sites) that are appropriate and accessible to a working urban population.  Therefore, in accordance with the mission of the University, the collections of the Brown-Daniel Library’s Federal publications support the needs of the University’s instructional programs and curriculum.                                                                                                                                                                                                                     P16
    Also, in accordance with the requirements defined in the Instructions to Depository Libraries , Guidelines for the Depository Library System , and the Federal Depository Library Manual , this unit strives to serve the government information needs of the constituents of the 5th U. S. Congressional District. This district includes three metropolitan areas: Nashville-Davidson metropolitan government, Springfield (city), and Goodlettsville (city). According to the 2010 Census Summary File 1, the general population in Nashville Davidson metropolitan government is 601,222, in Springfield city is 16,440, and in Goodlettsville city is 15,921.
    According to the Census, 2006-2010 ACS, two largest Industries by Occupation for the Civilian Employed Population 16 Years and Over for Nashville-Davidson metropolitan government are management, business, science, and arts occupations (111,027) and sales and office occupations (81,686). The two largest industries of Springfield city are production, transportation, and material moving occupations (1,948) and manufacturing (1,720). The two largest industries of Goodlettsville city are management, business, science, and arts occupations (3,046) and sales and office occupations (2,628). These useful statistics from the 5th Congressional District can be used in selecting federal publications for the users of this community.
  3. Selection Responsibility
    The Government Documents Librarian primarily makes selection of federal publications and supporting materials. Recommendations are considered from the reference staff, director, faculty, students and anyone interested. The Documents Librarian makes an annual review and update of the collection. The library will maintain the list of core documents outlined in the Guideline for the Depository Library System.
  4. Subject Area and Collection Arrangement Page17
    Based on the subject areas mentioned in the mission statement, materials are strongly selected from agencies that cover the following  subjects:
    Agriculture                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             P17
    Census
    Congress
    Defense
    Education
    Health
    Justice
    Labor
    Government
    Other subject areas include:
    Law
    Business
    Social Science
    Political Science
    Science and Technology
  5. Formats
    a) All formats are selected, some less than others, paper, microfiche, pamphlets, maps, CD-ROM, online, and floppy disks. Most are supplied by GPO in online format. Online is the preferred format.   Microfiche or online is preferred for lesser-used documents that are bulky in paper. Maps are rarely selected.
    b) Publication types selected include: handbooks, manuals, guides, reports, statistical publications, bibliographies, periodicals, monographs, series, bulletins, yearbooks, pamphlets, directories, laws and regulations.
  6. Selection Tools
    a) GPO Subject Bibliographies
    b) List of Classes of U.S. Government Publications Available for Selection by Depository Libraries
    c) Catalog of U.S. Government Publications (formally called Monthly Catalog of U.S. Publications)
    d) Guide to Popular U.S. Government Publications
    e) Federal Depository Library Manual
    f) Publications reference File
    g) Commercial Publishers
  7. Resource Sharing                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 P18 
    a) Agreements for cooperative collection development with other libraries are coordinated through the TLA GODORT.
    b) Other area depositories are, Fisk University, Vanderbilt University, Nashville Public Library, Tennessee State Library and Archives, and University of Memphis (regional).
    c) Information is also shared through the Middle Tennessee Depository Council and informal methods of communication via telephone, e- mail or listservs like GOVDOC-L, TNGOVDOC, and Marcive Web Docs-Express (an online database which allows users to find out what other depositories may select certain items).
  8. Weeding and Maintenance
    The collection will be maintained in accordance with the guidelines set out in the Instructions to Depository Libraries. Due to limited staffing, weeding is conducted when time permits.
  9. Access
    All Government Documents are accessible for public use in the library. Documents are located on the second floor in the Reference Department. Documents do not circulate but are accessible during all operational hours. The majority of documents is arranged by Superintendent of Documents Classification System (SuDoc) and is listed in the library’s online system through Marcive’s ongoing cataloging package. A very small percentage of documents are catalogued and shelved in the main reference collection by the Library of Congress classification system. Indexes used to identify federal publications and provide access to information are: FDSYS, Marcive Web Docs-Express, Catalog of U.S. Government Publications (paper and electronic format), Publications Reference File (PRF).

C. Juvenile Literature
The juvenile literature collection is housed on the main campus of the Brown-Daniel Library. The collection is selective rather than comprehensive. The purpose of the collection is to support the children’s literature course taught in the
College of Education and the early childhood education programming in the Family and Consumer Sciences Dept. The library uses the following criteria, in addition to the general criteria for the selection of library materials, to choose the material for the collection.                                                                                                                                                               P19

  1. Materials are collected in book form only.                 
  2. All Caldecott, Newbery, and Coretta Scott King award books are selected including honorable mentions and runners up. ALA Notable Children’s Books are also added to the collection.
  3. All faculty recommendations are strongly considered for purchase.
  4. Textbooks, paperbacks children’s reference books, and abridged children’s classics are not purchased.
  5. Only one copy of each title will be ordered.

D. Serials
The serials collection must be sufficient to support the educational and research programs of the university. Serials are publications issued in successive parts bearing numeric or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely, such as periodicals, newspapers and annuals, standing orders, multi-volume sets issued in separate years. Formats forserials include print, non-print and electronic all of which will be considered in the library’s purchase and/or access decisions.

  1. Serials Selection 
    The TSU Libraries has a limited serials budget, which must be used to maintain two (2) campuses; therefore, serials selection and de-selection decisions are made with very careful consideration. Both campuses will subscribe to the same title only in cases of titles that are   popular and inexpensive (e.g. Ebony). Academic titles with heavy usage on both campuses will be provided electronic format.The library supplies electronic access to popular periodicals and newspaper via its databases. Many of these titles are available for mobile access . The Head of the Reference Department selects the continuations/standing orders for the reference collection. Electronic journals that are free on the web are selected by the Dean of Libraries and the Assistant Director of Collection Management. Serials inflation averages at least 10-15% annually. In some cases it may be appropriate to purchase electronic access or document delivery services for serials instead of acquisition through subscription.
  2. Serials Priorities
    a) Curriculum suppo
    c) General education and news coverage.

  3. Procedure for Requesting New Serial Titles                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        P20
    a) Recommendations for the selection and review of a periodical title can be emailed to the Head of Acquisitions and Serials or sent via the Suggested Purchase link on the library’s website. Faculty, administrative staff, students, support staff, and the Collection Development Committee are eligible to make recommendations for new periodical titles.
    b)
    Upon receiving a request for a new title, the Head of  Acquisitions and Serials, will search the EBSCO A-Z database to  check for current access. The Library Dean will be   consulted concerning the appropriateness of the title. In most   cases, primary consideration is given to the need and the   availability of funds. Patrons making requests are notified of   the status of their orders, in writing by the Assistant Director   for Collection Management
  4. Collection gaps are reviewed and acted upon individually based on   users’ demand and availability of funds. Gifts that do not duplicate the l ib rary holdings will be evaluated on a case by case basis.
  5. Backfiles
    a)
    Requests for back files of new subscriptions will be reviewed separately. Back files for newly initiated subscriptions will normally not be immediately acquired until use patterns of current issues have been established, as well as the need for back issues determined.
    b)
    Missing backfiles of titles to which the library is subscribing will be acquired according the availability of funds and the evidence of need. When acquiring back files, the most preferred format will be electronic.
  6. Serials De-Selection
    a)
    De-selection is the process of removing items from the collection. Criteria for de-selection include: incomplete and short runs of a title are pulled; when the subscription has lapsed or ceased publishing; titles which contain information that is not useful; short-term formats, such as newsletters: annuals such as periodical indexes which have been cancelled; availability of back issues in electronic archives such as JSTOR, which allow library ownership.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 P21
    b)
    When the budget allows, dual subscriptions to the print and electronic full text versions of periodicals will be maintained when the online version is free with subscription or has an embargo period that will impede research in heavily researched areas.
    c)
    The Collection Development Committee in consultation with the Serials Librarian will determine de-selection of titles.
  7. Serial Drop Add/Guidelines
    A comprehensive review of serial holdings will be conducted every year as a part of the renewal process. During the Spring Semester, departments will have the opportunity to assess the usefulness of titles assigned to their subject area. The Librarian Liaisons will be involved in the process by being responsible for follow-up information once the Serials staff disseminates serial holdings information to faculty via Department Heads. Recommendations for adding and/or dropping serials are welcomed and encouraged from faculty members.

E. Electronic Journals: The criteria for acquisition of electronic journals for TSU Libraries are:

  1. Journal titles should and must support the academic programs of the university.
  2. Printed subscription journal titles with free online accessibility will be acquired and maintained. If titles are subject to fee accessibility, acquisition will be subject to requestor justification and the Collection Development Committee approval, based on course need and budget availability.
  3. If the journal costs increase to the point where the print and the online versions are too expensive to maintain, the online version will be preferred.
  4. Electronic journal selection is the responsibility of the Head of  Acquisitions and Serials in Consultation with the Library Dean and the Collection Development Committee.Open Access Journals- the library will add electronic journals which
  5. are free via open access, such as Pub Med Central and the Directory of Open Access Journals. The databases and/or archives can be either browsed or searched.

F. Serials Binding                                                                                                                                                      P22
In general, periodicals and journals are bound on a regular basis, provided that funding is available. Journals supplied by JSTOR will be bound on a selective basis, depending upon “moving walls” and embargo statuses. As a general rule, incomplete volumes or years are bound indicating missing issues.

G. Serial Gifts
Periodicals are a vital part of the library and it is imperative that the collection is complete and up-to-date. For a variety of reasons certain issues may be missing and this is where the gifts are valuable, as they will enable the department to bind volumes that are incomplete. However, the following rules should apply in acceptance of gifts.

  1. A person wishing to donate periodicals to the library should inform the Acquisitions/Serials Department of the type of materials via a list that he/she has to offer prior to sending any materials to the library. The Librarian will decide whether or not to accept or reject materials on the basis of need.
  2. Donor rather than the department should make the value estimation of gift periodicals rather than the department.
  3. The department reserves the right to dispose of the duplicate copies.
  4. The gift titles are listed in the form letter sent to donor; a copy is   retained in the department.
  5. Periodicals must be in good, clean usable condition.
  6. Gift periodicals are acknowledged by a gift letter.

H. Reference

  1. The Reference Collection is a non-circulating collection of resources designed to meet the basic and advanced research needs of the University community. The collection strives to support research at all university levels. It is also designed to provide quick access to factual information in all subject fields for verification, location, and information needs of researchers. These materials are reviewed and evaluated on a regular basis and outdated resources are sent to circulation, removed, or updated.
  2. Monographic reference materials are selected on the basis set forth in the collection development policy section on selection criteria. The serials selection criteria is applied to reference serials or continuations such as annuals, standing orders, series, and multi-volume reference sets which are published in installments.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             P23
  3. The electronic format is preferred for encyclopedias, dictionaries, handbooks, indexes, abstracts, bibliographies, directories, biographies, guides, almanacs, yearbooks, statistical maps and atlases, however, these sources will be purchased in print format when the print is the only format available or the cost of the electronic version is too expensive.
    The reference collection may include other titles which are generally  considered to be standard reference tools, as well as those which are locally regarded as pertinent to specific use patterns peculiar to TSU community. Any titles which meet these criteria are subject to selection and inclusion in the collection.

I. Services to the Disabled
The TSU libraries are ADA compliant. They do not collect books in special formats for the disabled, e.g. materials in Braille or large print books, however, the libraries do provide access to materials in special formats for the disabled through its Interlibrary Loan service. The main campus library has a computer for the visually impaired.
The library will work cooperatively with the Office of Disabled Services and with Office of Diversity and International Affairs to provide resources that meet the needs of students.

J. Foreign Languages
Coverage of materials written in or about foreign languages shall be limited to titles which support courses taught by the Literature, Languages, and Philosophy Department. Selection of foreign language literature other than those taught in the College of Liberal Arts shall be left to the discretion of the Acquisitions librarian after consultation with the library liaison to the department.

K. Gifts

  1. The library maintains an active gifts program, accepts book and non- print resources as well as cash. Gift materials are subject to same selection criteria as purchased materials.
  2. The Acquisitions Librarian supervises gift acceptance, and weeds duplicates of titles already in the collection and titles not suitable for academic libraries, i.e. joke books. Library Liaisons will be consulted when donations fall within their subject areas.                                                                                            P24
  3. Acceptance of gifts does not necessarily mean that they will be added to the collection. The library retains the right to dispose of gift materials as it sees fit.
  4. Gifts of significant monetary value, which may require special arrangements will be considered on an individual basis. If library receives a gift of rare items, it will make every effort to preserve the materials by providing proper security and environment.
  5. Donors should supply the library with a list of the items donated, which includes their current address and telephone number. A letter of appreciation will be sent by the Head of Acquisitions and Serials.
  6. As a rule, the library only accepts gifts with an agreement that any items not added to the general collection will be returned to the owner or disposed of at the library’s discretion.
  7. Unaccepted books in bad condition, i.e., broken spines, brittle or missing pages, water, insect, rodent, or pet damaged will be thrown away. Books in good condition, but duplicate the library’s holdings will be returned to the donor or disposed of according to university regulations.
  8. The library will not pay for any unsolicited gifts.
  9. The library staff does not have the training or expertise to provide book appraisals for tax purposes. Donors receive an acknowledgement letter citing the number of books accepted by the library.
  10. The donor should sign the Tennessee State University libraries’ Gift Acceptance Form. The library will retain one copy of the form for its records.
  11. The Dean of Libraries and Media Centers is the final authority on      the acceptance and rejection of gifts.

L. TSU Theses and Dissertations                                                                                                                                  P25
Universitytheses and dissertations are accessible in digital format on the library’s website under Dissertations @TSU and from the Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations for U.S. Colleges and Universities are available in a separate database. Print editions prior to 2006 are available through the online catalog. One copy is housed in Special Collections and does not      circulate. The second copy circulates and is shelved in the Circulation Area.

M. Consortia and Contractual Agreements
The TSU libraries have a reciprocal borrower agreement with the John A. Gupton College of Mortuary Science, which allows students at both institutions to borrow materials each other’s libraries. The libraries are actively involved in informal consortium agreements with Tenn-Share,
RODP, Project Athena, TBR Library Consortium, TBR Media Consortium, Tennessee Electronic Library (TEL) and Tennessee Area Libraries Consortium (TALC) for the purpose of sharing resources, as well as with LYRASISto provide cataloging records, training, products, and services.

TSU Media Centers belong to the Tennessee Board of Regents Media Consortium. The Executive Director for the Consortium negotiates annual agreements with the media vendors, which enable Board of Regent institutions to purchase media from several major vendors at reduced cost.

N. Distance Learning
TSU libraries support the curriculum for distance learning, extended education, and the embedded librarian program. The online catalog,streaming video, periodical holdings, subject bibliographies, research databases, polices, materials order forms are available from the TSU libraries’  website and can be access via the web or telnet. The libraries participate in the Regents Online Degree Program (RODP). For more information see “Off Campus Library Services Policies and Procedures- section of the policy.

O. Media Centers
The TSU Media Centers seek to support the academic curriculum by providing audio-visual materials selected by the Media Services Coordinator and the faculty.
The collection contains VHSs, DVDs, Blue-Rays, CD-ROMs and audiocassettes. Since media usage varies by department and some departments have their own funding for media while others do not, no funding formula is used. When several titles are requested, departments are asked to prioritize their requests. Media is purchased by the Coordinator as funds become available. Weeded materials are offered to TBR colleges and universities prior to being discarded. All audio-visual materials purchased from the Media Centers’ budget will be housed in the Media Centers. Digital and other emerging technologies will be collected as funds allow.                                                                                                P26

P. Avon Williams Library Collection
The Avon Williams Campus Library has a full range of library services and collections designed to support the research needs of students, faculty, and staff. The acquisition of new materials is focused on the academic departments based on the Avon Williams Campus. The College of Business, College of Public Service and Urban Affairs, Speech Pathology and Audiology,    Health Administration, Health Sciences and Nursing are supported through extensive collection development and management.

The Avon Williams Campus periodical collection covers accounting, business information systems, economics, finance, management, marketing, public administration, and speech pathology. Additional coverage areas include: nursing, health care administration, health sciences, physical therapy, law, social science, political science, computer science, and technology.    Popular titles available for browsing include: Ebony, Men’s Journal, O: The Oprah Magazine, Red Bulletin, Rolling Stone, and Today’s Black Woman. As a partner in resource sharing with the Main Campus, books are readily exchanged and shared via campus courier to serve the needs of library patrons.

IV. Electronic Resources

A. TSU Libraries provide a wide variety of database services to support the academic programs of the university. These electronic services enable TSU students and faculty to gain rapid access to both commercial and governmental online resources. Databases services greatly enhance the libraries’ collection by providing patrons with access to periodicals and other non-print research documents not physically owned by the library. Among the electronic services provided by the library are electronic reserves (Docutek), Ask A Librarian, the online catalog, Encore, Research Guides andthe university digital repository.

B. Computer based searches produce online references, which include abstracts and selected full text information. The subjects covered in these services are wide ranging and are chosen for their support of the curriculum, as well as for graduated and faculty research.

C. Funding-Subscriptions to online databases are funded through state allocations, Title III grant funds and the Technology Access Fee (TAF).

D. Training                                                                                                                                                              P27
The Reference Department has the responsibility for training library patrons to use electronic resources.

E. Selection
In collaboration with the Dean of Libraries and Media Centers, the Reference Department along with the faculty reviews and recommends electronic databases for purchase. Since the purchase of technology is expensive and many sources of information are available through computer networks, librarians have had to make hard decisions between acquiring information in traditional versus electronic formats.

  1. Trial offers are accepted.
  2. Electronic resources selected for addition to the collection should present seamless types of application, ease of use for the patrons, menu driven screens, user friendly help screens, and be formatted for compatibility with the library’s computer network.
  3. Cost considerations, as well as the ability of the database to economically offer access to a wide range of research materials that library that the library cannot afford to purchase in print are also major factors.

E. Monographs with Computer Software
Compact discs which accompany books will be housed in the Reserves    area of the Circulation Department. The books will be shelved in the general collection.

V. Websites

1. Objective:  
The TSU libraries support the university’s curriculum by supplying access to information on many levels and in various formats. The library seeks to promote and enhance the teaching /learning process by introducing new technologies to its users as they become available. By cataloging websites of scholarly interestand adding them to the online catalog, the library introduces additional resources to its users, as well as expands the quantity and quality of information available for research.

2. Selection Criteria:  
The subject matter must be relevant to the current curriculum as written in TSU’s Undergraduate and Graduate catalogs.    Websites should be sponsored by an authoritative source, such as a professional association or governmental agency. Community sponsored websites, such as online encyclopedias, internet search engines, e.g. Google Scholar, or personal websites that feature scholarly information and are popularly used for academic research will be added on a case by case basis. All of the selected websites must be free of charge. All selected websites should comply with general selection principles stated in the current Collection Development Policy. The information should be current, and unless special circumstances are approved, the website should be in the English language.                                                                                            P28

3. Selection Responsibility and Tools:
Faculty members and Library Liaisons can recommend websites for cataloging. Selected websites are sent to the Cataloging Dept. for processing. Cataloged web sites can be found in the online catalog and can be accessed by subject, title, institution, URL, or call number. Website reviews can be found in standard selection tools such as CHOICE, the Charleston Advisor, College & Research Libraries News, and Library Journal. Whenever possible, websites which are recommended for cataloging should have a current review available. This will help address patron concerns about the integrity, currency, and authenticity of the information.

4. De-Selection:
Since the internet itself is constantly changing and evolving, websites can be transitional. The library will attempt to be vigilant about de-selecting websites as the need arises. Such need would occur in the following instances:

  1. The website is withdrawn from the internet.
  2. Reliable information is no longer available from the site.
  3. The site is revised and a new URL is provided.
  4. Another site offers more valuable or updated information (depth, relevance, etc.)
  5. The URL is unreliable and frequently leads to error messages.

5. Copyright Statement:
Copyright guidelines can be located on the library’s homepage [see “Virtual Reference”].

VI. De-Selection Policy

A. Weeding:
the purpose of weeding is mainly to remove superseded editions, obsolete volumes, and badly worn or damaged materials. “Shelf sitters” or seldom-used volumes may also be weeded. Unneeded multiple copies are often discarded or placed in storage in order to solve space problems.

B. Responsibility:                                                                                                                                                     P29

  1. The library liaisons, in consultation with their faculty, are responsible for weeding materials in their assigned subject areas. During the spring semester, they may request a list of titles in their area by Library of Congress Classification. Titles slated for weeding can be identified on the list, which in turn can be shared with faculty.
  2. During the summer months, the library liaison can physically remove books from the shelves and send them to the Cataloging Department for withdrawal from the collection.
  3. Faculty advice is frequently sought before any major discards or storage takes place. On occasion, faculty advice is sought regarding replacement of lost items.

C. Guidelines:

  1. Books that have not circulated for ten years may be discarded depending upon relevancy and space.
  2. Books containing outdated and/or inaccurate information.
  3. Superseded editions, unless an earlier edition has historical value.
  4. Excess number of duplicate copies of books.
  5. Physical condition of books is beyond repair.
  6. Books that were a poor choice in terms of the mission of the library.
  7. Obsolete textbooks.
  8. General encyclopedias that are more than seven years old.
  9. Almanacs, yearbooks, and bibliographies that are more than five years old.
  10. Periodicals that are not indexed.
  11. Incomplete sets.
  12. Serials that have ceased publication and do not have a cumulative index.
  13. Records of lost or long overdue books will be deleted after one year.

VII. Withdrawal of Materials

A. Library Collections

After materials have been identified for withdrawal, the Head of Cataloging or coordinators assume the responsibility of removing the materials from the collection. This is done in compliance to the policy set forth by the Tennessee Board of Regents. The policy states that all properties removed from the institution are to be compiled into a list and offered to other TBR schools.  They must be advertised for a period of thirty days, usually via the internet. None requested materials will be removed from the libraries and Media Centers. All materials withdrawn must be stamped withdrawn.                             P30

  1. Single copies or last copies must be removed from the online catalog and OCLC.
  2.  If there are other copies available on the shelf, holdings will not be deleted from OCLC.
  3. A list of discarded materials indicating call number, author, title, edition, and publication date will be processed. A number will be given each list and that same number will be assigned to the box it represents. Each box should have a separate list.
  4. The Cataloging Department process two copies; one is to be kept in our files and one is to be placed on the box.
  5. The appropriate person is notified, papers are dated and signed and the materials are removed from library.

 

 

 

 

 

Collection Development Policy Index                                                                                                                   P31

Acquisitions Strategy, 4
Avon Williams, 25
Book Allocation Formula, 5
Consortium and Contractual Agreements, 25
Distance Learning, 25
Electronic Journals, 21
Electronic Resources (Reference), 26-27
Foreign Language Materials, 23
Gift Policy (Books), 23
Gift Policy (Serials), 22
Government Documents, 15-18
Hardcover Books, 6
Intellectual Freedom Statement, 7
Interlibrary Loan, 6
Juvenile Literature, 18-19
Library Liaison Program, 9-11
Material Selection, 7
Mission Statement, 4
Media Centers, 25
Number of Copies, 6
Out of Print Books, 7
Paperbacks, 6
Policy Statement, 7
Profile of University, 3
Reference, 22
Serials, 19-21
Services for the Disabled, 23
Special Collections Dept, 11-15
Textbooks, 7
Theses and Dissertations, 24
Websites, 25-26
Weeding, 27
Withdrawal of Materials, 28-30






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